The Return of Victory Gardens

How times of crisis and unrest have brought people to gardening in the name of patriotism and self-sufficiency.

Victory Gardens have played an important and interesting role in American History. A Victory Garden or “War Garden” was a garden plot either public or private that was put in to grow usable fruits and vegetables in times of war and crisis, these generally took up ALL available land for gardening use. Victory gardens first popped up during World War 1 when the US government urged citizens to use any viable open land to grow fruits and vegetables for themselves so that more food could be exported overseas to soldiers and allies. This started a trend that would pop up again with even more might in World War 2 due to mandatory food rationing. Eleanor Roosevelt even planted a Victory Garden on the White House lawn.

By having these gardens, the US people were able to boost overall morale, help prevent food shortages at home, ease the burden on commercial farmers, and create a sense of patriotism for everyone involved. In 1944, about 20 million victory gardens produced the equivalent of 40 percent of all fresh fruits and vegetables consumed in the US. 

While there is not any urging by the government in these trying times, hundreds of thousands of people in the US are planting gardens and buying up chickens to produce their own eggs to be more self-sufficient. It is important to remember that garden centers have been deemed “essential business” so there are no barriers to gathering supplies to make your own victory garden.

We will be victorious, it will just take time and effort from all of us to stay home and stay safe. What better way to do that than with a garden that provides you with food and pride in this uncertain time. You do not need a house with a backyard to garden. With the use of countertop gardens, hanging baskets, and container gardening on porches, anybody can have their own victory garden. Oregon Wire has garden supplies for all kinds of gardeners with a variety of hanging baskets, trellises, and plant cages to support what you grow.